Performance Incentive Fund (PIF) Activities

2012-13 Activities Supported by The Performance Incentive Fund (PIF)

The Massachusetts Department of Higher Education has established The Performance Incentive Fund (PIF).  This fund “…is designed to support activity on Massachusetts’ public college and university campuses that will advance the Vision Project goals of national leadership in…educational outcome areas…(including)…Student Learning and Assessment.”
NECC was awarded a PIF grant in September 2012 to support the Core Academic Skills Initiative, which focuses on student learning and assessment.  PIF was used to support activities related to:
  • Creating core academic skills intensive courses across the curriculum,
  • Increasing the number of faculty involved in the core skills effort,
  • Increasing the number of additional courses infused with core skills, and
  • Developing and implementing core skills assessment processes based on the LEAP VALUE rubrics.
To view the full report on AY 2012 – 2013 PIF activities, click here.

 

FALL 2012 Activities

Core Academic Skills Coaches – A team of eight coaches was created, each of whom has expertise in one of the core skills.  Each coach has promoted their core skill across the curriculum by reaching out to faculty and staff and providing information and/or assistance in developing teaching modules and assignments that reflect the criteria and learning outcomes defined for the skills.

The eight coaches and their areas of expertise are:

Core Skill Name Email
Global Awareness Kristi Arford karford@necc.mass.edu
Informational Literacy Gail Stuart  & 

Ann Grandmaison
gstuart@necc.mass.edu
agrandmaison@necc.mass.edu
Public Presentation Linda Desjardins ldesjardins@necc.mass.edu
Quantitative Reasoning Lori Heymans lheymans@necc.mass.edu
Science Ken Thomas kthomas@necc.mass.edu
Technology Paul Chanley pchanley@necc.mass.edu
Writing Elle Yarborough eyarborough@necc.mass.edu

Minutes of Coaches Meetings

Project Rubrics
Core Skills Overview Session – On November 27, 2012, the core academic skills coaches presented a session to faculty which provided an overview of how each of the core academic skills could be incorporated into classes across all disciplines. Specific purposes included to:
  • increase faculty interest and awareness concerning each of the core skills,
  • reiterate the need to rapidly ensure that degree programs include courses intensive in each of the skills,
  • ensure that faculty were aware of the availability of coaches to assist in this effort, and
  • announce the plans for the spring workshops to serve as an additional resource to faculty interested in infusing classes with the skills and/or moving towards making a course intensive.
Twenty-seven faculty attended the workshop, including 15 full-time and 12 adjuncts.  Disciplines represented included Business, Early Childhood Education, History, Philosophy, Computer Information Science, Engineering, Chemistry, and Biology.
The links to the presentations shown are included below:

SPRING 2013 ACTIVITIES

Workshops
  • Workshop I was held in early February and provided small group guidance for instructors who wanted to create a single assignment which strengthened one of the core skills, regardless of whether or not the course will be designated as “intensive.” Fifty-one faculty attended this workshop, including 26 full-time and 25 adjuncts. Forty-one classes in 25 disciplines were represented.
  • Workshop 2 in early March was designed to help instructors create a one or two week plan to integrate one of the core skills into a series of classroom activities. Thirty-eight faculty attended this workshop, including 18 full-time and 20 adjuncts.  Twenty-one classes in 15 disciplines were represented.
  • Workshop 3 in early April, faculty worked on assessing student products using the VALUE and the newly designed core skills rubrics. Forty-two faculty attended this workshop, including 17 full-time and 25 adjuncts.  Twenty-nine classes in 14 disciplines were represented.
  • Workshop 4 in early Maywas offered to faculty members who, using materials prepared in previous workshops or with the guidance of the coaches and with departmental approval, would transform a course for intensive designation. Nineteen faculty attended this workshop, including 15 full-time and 4 adjuncts.  Nineteen courses in 8 disciplines were represented, with each course associated with an application being submitted for intensive status.
  • Workshop 5 on June 11, participants spent the day making a course intensive in one of the core skills. Instructors explored the various ways the skill can be infused into any curriculum, designed assignments and class activities to strengthen the skill, practiced using a rubric to evaluate the skill in student products, and created an application to designate the course intensive in that skill. Fifteen faculty attended this workshop, including 9 full-time and 6 adjuncts.  Seventeen courses in 7 disciplines were represented, with each course associated with an application being submitted for intensive status.
  • Workshop 6 on June 12 was open to any faculty member who would like to at least infuse one of the core skills into their own classes. This workshop was conducted in two parts: the morning session allowed small groups to practice evaluating student work with one of the core skills rubrics; the afternoon session focused on creating assignments and class activities to strengthen the same core skill. Twenty-nine faculty attended this workshop, including 9 full-time and 20 adjuncts.  Twenty-five classes in 13 disciplines were represented.
Workshop feedback: After the Overview Session and each of the workshops, surveys were administered electronically to participants to collect feedback.  Summaries of the survey responses, which were overwhelmingly positive, are as follows:
Sample assignments produced in connection with the workshops relating to the core skills include:

 

2013-14 Activities Supported by The Performance Incentive Fund (PIF)

Project Rubrics