2009-2010 Participants

Paul Cavan, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice

Early Intervention Leadership Project

The Early Intervention Leadership Project is designed to improve completion and retention rates of students enrolled in sections of Introduction to Criminal Justice (CRJ 101). Currently CRJ 101 is an “Open Enrollment” course, the first class typically taken by students in the criminal justice curriculum. On average, over 35% of the students registering for this course have either tested into basic reading and/or writing sections, or have not taken the NECC assessment placement tests. These students face an uphill battle in the college environment since they often lack the necessary reading, writing and organizational skills to be academically successful. Early Invention Strategies will be implemented to provide needed support and guidance for students identified in the first two weeks of the semester as being at risk for not successfully completing course work.
The current completion rates for CRJ 101 sections at NECC are 59%. It is the intent of this project to improve these rates and create a model for early intervention strategies for all 100 level criminal justice courses.


Jayne Ducharme, Academic Advisor

Advising the Late Student

Academic Advisor Jayne Ducharme and Enrollment Counselor Analuz Garcia reflect on their experience advising students registered in the spring 2010 pilot Late Start Classes. Practicing an Intrusive Advising Model allowed them to learn more about why students register late for classes and what level of support these students need to be successful. Jayne and Analuz will share recommendations on how to increase the completion and retention rates of this fragile population.


Lynda Gagnon, Adjunct Professor of Developmental Reading

Socratic Circles

Socratic Circles are designed to foster classroom discussion based on a previously read passage. Socrates believed that through the exchange of ideas in a “disciplined conversation”, deeper understanding would result. Student preparedness is of great importance to the success of this activity.
Students sit in two circles, an inner circle and an outer circle. Only the students sitting in the inner circle participate in the conversation/discussion. Students in the outer circle observe the body language and the content and quality of the discussion. After 15-20 minutes the students change positions, whereby the inner circle becomes the outer circle and vice versa.


Analuz Garcia, Enrollment Counselor

Advising the Late Student

Academic Advisor Jayne Ducharme and Enrollment Counselor Analuz Garcia reflect on their experience advising students registered in the spring 2010 pilot Late Start Classes. Practicing an Intrusive Advising Model allowed them to learn more about why students register late for classes and what level of support these students need to be successful. Jayne and Analuz will share recommendations on how to increase the completion and retention rates of this fragile population.


Jim Murphy, Assistant Professor of Theatre

Check back for details.


Maureen O’Leary, Marketing Manager

Marketing Communications Website

We all deal with last minute and unplanned projects. But what if we could minimize these unplanned projects by communicating the services that we offer – and the time required to utilize these services? My leadership project was to create a marketing communications website to be used as a tool for the internal audience to better understand the resources that marketing communications offers, and how to best access them. The goal is for improved efficiency and effectiveness and better results for us all.


Patricia Schade, Assistant Professor of Developmental Reading

Reading for Understanding: Staff and Faculty Inquiry Group

Inquiry starts with noticing, and at NECC, what many of us have noticed is our students are challenged and overwhelmed by reading at the level that they need to in order to succeed. Many students practice “surface reading” very similar to the type of reading they do online, but they don’t use self-checking metacognitive skills to adjust their reading strategies in order to read and understand difficult texts, unwrap word problems or essay questions, or even answer multiple choice questions on exams.
This cross-curricular group investigated how we can help students become more proficient and independent readers. We created a survey to assess how, what, and if students read. My goal in chairing this SFIG was to heighten awareness campus-wide of the crucial role reading plays in student success, to provide professional development on mentoring students in reading, to improve student reading and support metacognitive conversations about reading between students, faculty, and staff.


Ken Thomas, Professor of Biology

My Leadership Project or “How I Spent My 2009-2010 Academic Year”

This presentation illustrates the process that I experienced as I developed this Leadership Project. It takes the viewer through my journey as I struggled to remain true to my ambitions and goals as a student oriented professor, while working to form a support group for our liberal arts biology students.


Photos and Comments

Fall 2010 Retreat Photos
 
Shown (left to right): Analuz Garcia, Patricia Schade, Lynda Gagnon, Maureen O'Leary, Jayne Ducharme, Ellen Grondine (Planning Committee), Ken Thomas, Mary Chatigny (Planning Committee) and Jim Murphy
From left to right: Ken Thomas, Jayne Ducharme, Analuz Garcia and Ellen Grondine
Partial Group Photo. From left to right: Mary Chatigny, Lynda Gagnon and Maureen O’Leary
From left to right: Mary Chatigny and Judith Kamber (both Planning Committee members)
Paul Cavan